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Roy L. Williams
Director of Public Relations
Birmingham Public Library
Work No.: (205) 226-3746
Cell No. : (205) 572-1359
a: 2100 Park Place, Birmingham, AL 35203
w: www.bplonline.org
e: roy.williams@cobpl.org
BPL Media contact: Roy L. Williams, 205-572-1359

BPL Black History Workshops Explore History of Racial Redlining in Birmingham

Birmingham, Ala.-Two Black History Month workshops taking place at the Central Library February 9 and February 23 will explore the history of racial redlining in Birmingham.
Paul Boncella, the map conservator for the Birmingham Public Library’s Southern History Department, will conduct present workshops focused on two historic maps: The 1933 Postal Map of Birmingham and the  1938 Residential Security Map of Birmingham.

Click here for details https://bplolinenews.blogspot.com/2020/02/bpl-black-history-workshops-february-9.html

Boncella’s talks, both open to the public, are as follows: 

Birmingham Explored Race and Real Estate: Redlining Birmingham in 1938, Sunday, February 9, 3:00 p.m., Linn-Henley Research Library, Arrington Auditorium 

 A federal government effort to identify the areas of Birmingham best suited to receive home mortgages led to the creation of a map in 1938 that further defined racial boundaries sanctioned by the city's zoning ordinance of 1926. Paul Boncella of the Southern History Department examines the two versions of the federal government's redlining map and other documents to demonstrate how real estate zones were delineated and how the criteria for doing so were later invoked to justify preserving the city's racial divisions.

An Emblem of Segregation: The 1926 Birmingham Zoning Map, Sunday, February 23, 3:00 p.m., Linn-Henley Research Library, Arrington Auditorium 

A scheme to segregate the population of Birmingham by race existed both in theory and in practice long before the legislation that made it legal was passed in 1926. Paul Boncella of the Southern History Department examines the zoning map and other documents to demonstrate how the ordinance came into existence and why it was initially accepted by the population at large.
Page Last Modified: 8/4/2020 2:19 PM